MISSION STATMENT

The mission of the Nasal Physiology and Therapeutic Center is to study the interplay between nasal airflow, nasal obstruction, loss of smell and nasal sinus disease. Since the main physiological function of the nose is the passage of airflow, conditioning that airflow and sensing the odor within the flow (smell), it is important to understand one major question – how does the nose recognize and meet these functions? By exploring the answer to this question, our aim is to better understand what causes nasal obstruction, leading to a better understanding of the nature of nasal sinus disease and ultimately optimizing treatments or surgical options for nasal sinus disease.

RECENT LAB NEWS

New Procedure to Improve Nasal Airflow Aims to Help Patients Breathe Easy

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are exploring how small changes in the nasal cavity impact airflow and quality of life.

 

As part of a clinical trial, doctors use a new, non-invasive approach to reshape nasal tissue. The Vivaer Nasal Airway Remodeling device delivers radiofrequency energy to the nasal valve area to treat nasal obstruction, a condition that impacts millions of Americans. 

 

“What this technology does is reshape the internal nasal valve region, which is a region where cartilage on the side of your nose meets your septum,” said Dr. Brad Otto, assistant professor of otolaryngology at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center. “Basically what it causes the cartilage to do is barely denature and change its shape just a little bit in order to open up that valve and improve airflow to that region.”

For more information, please see link

https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/mediaroom/pressreleaselisting/study-of-new-procedure-to-improve-nasal-airflow-helps-patients-breathe-easy

When these flies want to sniff out food and mates, they wing it

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Fruit flies don't appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research published in Nature Communication, from The Ohio State University.

For more information, please see link

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180813120734.htm